FAQ Topics

  • Most FAQs
  • Gemestone Purchase Guide
  • General Queries
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  • Shipping & Delivery Policies

Astrology is an important part of our life as we know it and goes back to the early days of human existence. Apart from being centers of learning in medicine & science, Baghdad and Damascus were also known as centers of astrology and astronomy. Arabs were pioneers in astronomy before the advent of Islam. The Babylonians were the first to name the days of the week after the Sun, Moon, and planets. They were also the first to set out the twelve houses of the horoscope which we use in our modern astrological softwares and horoscope calculations today. Egypt was one of the most important places in the development of astrology. It is thought that some of the astrological signs of the zodiac originated in Egypt.


Gemstones and their Association with Zodiac Signs:



Astrology is being practiced since the Vedic/Ancient times and know there are several teaching centers all across India and now in USA, UK, China, Japan and many countries across Europe. Astrology is one of the six disciplines of vedanga. The Hindus believe that human fortune or misfortune in life is due to karma, and karma is believed to be influenced by the movements of the planets in the solar system. Among the Hindus, Brahmins are considered to be the best authorities on astrology. Most of the astrology teachers are also Brahmins. It is regarded as vital in Indian culture. It is used to make decisions about marriage, starting of new business, and moving into a new house etc. Ancient Hindu Scriptures too gives a lot of importance to the various aspects of planetary motions and its effects on humans.


Gemstones and their Association with Planets:


  • Mercury – Emerald, Green Onyx
  • Uranus – Aquamarine
  • Venus – Diamond, Jade
  • Neptune – Opal, Amethyst
  • Earth – Agate, Onyx
  • Pluto – Kunzite, Spinel
  • Mars – Red Coral, Garnet, Bloodstone
  • Moon – Pearls, Moonstone
  • Jupiter – Citrine, Yellow Sapphire
  • Sun – Ruby, Golden Topaz
  • Saturn – Sapphire, Kyanite, Iolite

Gemstones and their Association with Vedic Astrology:


Click the “My Account / Order Status” link at the top right hand side of our site to check your orders status. If you do not see a tracking number just send us a message and we will get back within 12 – 24 hours.

When you are at your home and ordering a ring online it could be tricky to get the correct ring size specially if there is no jeweller around you or you do not have time.

See below images if you want to find your ring size or just want to do a quick conversion when placing an order online at our store.


Ring “mm” Size Finder (If you do not know the size just wrap a thread around your finger and provide us the mm size after placing your order.


Remember the difference between Circumference and Diameter mm size!


International Ring Size Conversion Chart (Japanese and Indian Size is Same)


In some rare occasions you might be trying to pay online at our webpage with a credit card or paypal and even after several attempts the payment would not go through. This could happen because of several reasons:

  • Payment Processor under maintenance mode at the same time of your payment
  • Your credit or debit card data is being entered incorrectly. Please check CVV number
  • Your credit card or internet banking might not be compatible with our payment processor.

In either of the above mentioned cases please create a “support ticket/contact us” immediately and we will get back within few hours and help you by manually sending you a payment link or explain other options.

We offer the following payment options for our clients living within India (All States):

  • Debit Cards (Via CCavenue – India’s most trusted payment gateway)
  • Credit Cards (VISA, MasterCard, American Express, Discover, Diners)
  • NEFT Bank Transfer to our Account in India
  • Demand Draft
  • Cash on Delivery (We use reputed companies like Fedex, Gati and Blue Dart)

We offer the following payment options for our clients living outside India:

 

  • PayPal (Use your PayPal Account Balance or Pay with a Debit or Credit Card via PayPal – Opening a new PayPal Account is Not Necessary)
  • Debit Cards (Via PayPal – Opening Account is not necessary)
  • Credit Cards (VISA, MasterCard, American Express)
  • Bank Transfer to our Official Company Account in India
  • Western Union Money Transfer/Money-gram (Upto a Limited Amount)
 

Bello Jewels always looks after the the safety and security of our customers. We ensure that our transaction/checkout process is extremely safe and that our customer’s information is secure.

Payments

All payment and credit card information is handled on a secure page by either CCAvenue or PayPal. We have no access to your credit card or financial information. Both are market leaders when it comes to payment processing.

Credit Card Payments

We accept American Express, Visa and MasterCard through CCAvenue. The system supports Verified by Visa and MasterCard SecureCode. We also accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express through PayPal. All information is protected with SSL (Secure Socket Layering) technology, which allows two parties to communicate with each other via the Internet in a secure environment. It also allows for all information sent to be encrypted, ensuring that information cannot be intercepted or stolen while in transit.

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Bello Jewels respects personal information on its website. Your email address may be used temporarily to generate an email or order. In some occasions we will send you a friendly email reminder with an unsubscribe link.

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Bello Jewels uses browser cookies to enhance your visit at bellojewelsonline.com, its sub-domains and enable our online shopping cart. These cookies are used for our routine online marketing efforts. No personal information is stored in cookies. Cookies must be enabled to access all the features of our site.

We offer a “No Questions Asked” 14 days money back guarantee. 
This guarantee is limited to amount paid excluding any shipping amount. The return shipping cost (please use priority postal service only for shipping) is borne by buyer. In some cases we can arrange a reverse pick-up at no additional charge if you are located in India.

Conditions for Money Back Guarantee

  • The articles should be in the exact same condition at the time we shipped you and if box packing was included, you will have to return the same as well.
  • If you have got a custom jewel made then under no circumstances the making charges will be refunded and gemstone re-stocking fee of upto 25% may be applied .

The Gemstone Index

Adamantine: Refers to the diamond-like luster of a gemstone. Gemstones with a diamond-like luster include natural white diamond.

Adularescence: The shimmering light or whitish opalescence which shows up over the surface of some gems such as moonstone.

Alluvial Deposits: Gemstone deposits found in water after they have been separated from the main rough rock.

Amorphous: Gemstones without a crystal structure are referred to as amorphous. These include stones such as red coral, opal and freshwater pearls.

Asterism: The star effect that you see in star sapphires or star rubies, for example. This is usually caused by tiny silk rutile inclusions in the stone. The effect is generally six- rayed.

Baguette: A long rectangular gemstone shape, somewhat similar in shape to a loaf of French bread, hence the name.

Baroque Brilliant Cut: A round shaped stone that has 58 facets or more.

Bead: A gemstone with drilled hole in center or top mostly, usually round, designed to be strung.

Beryllium Treatment: A form of heat treatment for sapphires that adds the element beryllium to the heating process. Beryllium is an element well known in the gem world, since it is an essential constituent in many gemstones, including emerald and aquamarine. When sapphires are heated with beryllium, the result is a reduction in blue tones. Thus bright yellow or orange sapphire can be produced from weak yellow or greenish gems. Some stunning colors have been produced using this method.

Bi-color: A gemstone exhibiting two color zones, such as ametrine or tourmalines. In case of Ametrine for example you will see both violet and yellow infused together by nature.`

Birefringence: Some gemstones are singly refractive: they have only one refractive index. Other gemstones (in fact, most) are doubly refractive: they have two different refractive indices. When a beam of light enters a doubly refractive gem, it is split into two beams, each travelling at a different speed and on a different path through the crystal. Birefringence is a measurement of the difference between the two refractive indices in gems that are doubly refractive, and it ranges from a low of .003 to a high of .287. Very few gemstones are singly refractive; in fact, the only well-known gems with that property are diamond, spinel and garnet.

Birthstone: The association of gemstones with vedic astrology goes back centuries. More recently, jewelers have adapted this tradition to create a list of birthstones. Remember that a Birthstone is a Gemstone but a gemstone may not be a birthstone. For Example:

Yellow Sapphire is referred to as Pukhraj in Indian Astrology so it’s a Birthstone

Blue Topaz is a beautiful gemstone but not included anywhere in the Birthstone Index

Brilliance: The reflection and refraction of light displayed through a gemstone. Brilliance is sometimes referred to as “internal shine or luster” to distinguish it from surface luster.

Briolette: A teardrop or pear-shaped stone cut in triangular facets. Mostly used to created necklaces.

Cabochon Cut: A gem that is cut round without facets into the shape of a smooth polished dome. It lacks the facets that are on most stones and smooth to touch.

Calibrated (size): Many gemstones are sold in calibrated or standard sizes that will fit jewelry mountings. Standard sizes are calibrated in millimeters for a number of different gem shapes.

Carat: A unit of weight for gemstones. A carat is one fifth of a gram. So a 5Carat Stone = 1 Gram.

Cat’s Eye and Chatoyancy: The cat’s eye effect sometimes seen in gemstones such as chrysoberyl and apatite is known by the gemological name of chatoyancy. The effect is caused by tiny parallel inclusions that give the appearance of a narrow line similar to an eye of a cat. Often a gemstone needs to be viewed in natural light or under a pen-light to see the chatoyancy effect.

Center Stone: The center stone is the prominent center piece in a jewelry setting that has multiple gemstones. In case of engagement rings the main diamond is the center stone.

Clarity: Referring to the kind of inclusions present in a gemstone or other defects seen by naked eye or under a microscope it might have.

Cleavage: The plane of weakness of some gems where they will split apart with smooth surfaces. Gems with perfect cleavage are likely to break when being cut or faceted.

Color: Used in the evaluation of a gem. The quality or pricing of a gem can determined on either the presence or the absence of color.

Color Change: Color change gemstones change color due to changing light conditions or when under a pen-light (such as alexandrite or color change sapphire) or when viewed from different angles (such as andalusite or iolite).

Concave Cut: Traditional gem facets are flat or two-dimensional. Concave cutting creates facets that are curved or three-dimensional. These curved facets refract more of the ambient light and return it to the eye as brilliance. Concave cutting is a very recent gemstone faceting style. It requires considerable expertise and results in higher weight loss to the rough stone, since more material must be cut away to create the curved facets.

Crown: The top of a gemstone above the girdle. This terminology is used in the manufacturing process or when evaluating prices on a diamond in most cases.

Copper-bearing or Cuprian: Gemstones that contain traces of copper are very rare and typically have a intense-unique blue, blue-green or violet color. The first copper-bearing gemstones were discovered in late 90’s. Paraiba Copper Bearing tourmaline is one such example. 

Corundum: A crystalline form of aluminum oxide. Commonly referred to as ruby and sapphire in the gem world. It is found in clear and opaque forms, but can have different colors when impurities are present. Corundum is much admired for its hardness (9.0 on the Mohs scale), luster and rareness.

Cubic zirconia: A lab created diamond simulant, often abbreviated as CZ. While CZ is a transparent stone, trace elements can be added to the manufacturing process, producing a wide range of colors. On Mohs scale of hardness, a good quality CZ is harder than other gemstones except for diamond, ruby, sapphire and chrysoberyl. Not to be confused with Zircon, a natural gemstone mined from the earth and much more expensive.

Culet: The lowest part of a gemstone. This looks the tip or point of the stone.

Demantoid: A natural earth mined demantoid is a rare and valuable andradite garnet. It exhibits a range of greens from dull to bright emerald green and on rare occasions displays yellow. On Mohs scale of hardness, demantoid is relatively soft at 6.5. It has an adamantine luster.

Density or Specific Gravity: The ratio of a gemstone when compared to the weight of an equal volume of water. This means how heavy a gemstone is compared to the same volume of water. Also known as “specific gravity” for solids.

Diamond Cut: Also known as the Brilliant Cut or Round Brilliant Cut (RBC), the style of cutting a stone with multiple facets to maximize brilliance. Modern round brilliant cuts have 58 facets.

Dichroism: A term meaning the ability of some gems to display a second shade of the same color when viewed from a different angle. A dichroscope can see this change, and is used for identifying certain stone.

Diffusion Treatment: A form of heat treatment that adds one or more chemicals to the heating process to change the color of a gemstone. Typically the treatment does not penetrate deep into the stone, so gems treated in this way cannot be recut. Diffusion treatment is most commonly used in treating sapphires.

Dispersion: The property of a transparent stone to split light into the seven spectral/rainbow type colors, causing the “fire/luster” which is refracted by the internal facets. Diamond has a very high dispersion, hence it has high amount of fire/luster.

Double Refraction: The ability of most gems to split rays of light into two rays.

Doublet: A doublet is a gemstone composed of valuable gemstone material in combination with other materials. It is found most often in opal, where an opal doublet contains a slice of opal glued to common opal, glass or other material. A triplet contains a slice of opal glued between a base and a crystal or a glass top. Triplets are usually less expensive than doublets, and both are less expensive than natural opals. Doublets may occasionally be found with sapphire or other expensive gemstones.

Eye Clean: Refers to a gemstone that appears to have no visible inclusions or imperfections to the naked eye.

Facet: The cut and polished flat plane of a gemstone. There can be dozens of facets on a stone depending upon the rough in front of a cutter.

Fancy Cut: Gemstones are sometimes cut in non gemological shape other than the standard round or oval cut, but also used to refer to gemstones that are cut in a shape other than the well known shapes of round, oval, pear, trillion, marquise, etc.

Fire: The rainbow or colors that light rays form as they move through a gemstone. This is another word for “dispersion” in a gemstone.

Fissure: A surface crack or nick on a gemstone. Gems with fissures may be Fracture Filled to improve its appearance.

Fluorescence: The ability of some gems to appear a different color when viewed under ultraviolet light. If or not a stone has fluorescence is a valuable aid in gem identification.

Fracture Filling: Small cracks or fissures in a gemstone can interrupt the flow of light through the stone, creating white or “dead” spots in the color of the stone. Sometimes these fractures will be filled with material that will allow the light to pass through smoothly. Different materials are used; oil, wax, glass, epoxy, and borax are common materials. The most commonly filled stones are emerald and ruby.

Full Cut: A round-shaped or brilliant-cut gemstone.

Girdle: The widest point in circumference of a gem. This is the point where a gem is usually held by fingers or tweezers for examination.

Greasy (luster): One of the the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. Jadeite is an example of a gem with a greasy luster.

Heat Treatment: The application of high heat to a gemstone in order to improve its color and clarity.

Hue: Refers to the position of a color on the color wheel, or the dominant wavelength of color attributed to a gemstone. There are six primary hues: violet, blue, green, yellow, orange, and red. In between these primary hues are secondary hues, such as blue-green. See also tone and saturation

Inclusions: Foreign matter that is “included” within a stone. This may be a foreign body such as a crystal, a gas bubble or a pocket of liquid. There are many varieties of inclusions and they are important visual clues for identifying the type of gemstone and for identifying the origin of the stone.

Indicolite: Blue tourmaline. From bright blue hues to bluish green colors,indicolite tourmaline is one of the rarer tourmaline colors.

Iridescence: Effect caused by the interference of light on thin films within the gemstone.

Irradiation: Exposing gemstones to radioactive rays from x-rays or other material to change or enhance the original color. Blue topaz is always irradiated, for example.

Karat (Metal): Karat (as distinguished from Carat) is a measure of the purity of gold. Most gold jewelry is actually made from a gold alloy containing gold and another metal or metals. 18K gold, for example, is 75% pure gold.

Lab created: Refers to gemstones created in a laboratory rather than by nature. A lab created gemstone is typically the same material chemically as its natural counterpart, as in the case of corundum produced by flame fusion orquartz grown using the hydrothermal method.

Lapidary: The science and art of cutting and polishing gems to their finished state.

Loupe Clean: A gemstone is said to be Loupe Clean when no inclusions or defects are visible when the gem is viewed with 10 times magnification. See also Eye Clean.

Luster: The outward appearance of a gem or organic material. The quantity and quality of light that is reflected from the surface of a stone. Luster is important especially when evaluating the quality of pearls.

Marquise: The marquise shape is an elongated oval with points on both ends. Said to be named after the Marquise de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV.

Metallic (luster): One of the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. A gemstone that is reflective like polished metal is said to have a metallic luster. Hematite is one of the rare examples.

Mohs Hardness Scale: Numerical scale ranging from 1 to 10 developed by Friedrich Mohs that assigns a rating to a gem according to its ability to resist scratching. The hardest is 10 (diamond) and the softest is 1 (talc).

Synthetic Moissanite A lab-created diamond simulant based on the structure of natural moissanite. On Mohs’ scale of hardness, moissanite is 9.5. It has more brilliance, fire and luster than any hard jewel on earth, including diamond.

Oiling Oiling infuses colorless oils, resins or waxes into tiny surface-breaking fissures to hide them and give certain gemstones a cleaner appearance. This long-practiced clarity enhancement is used mainly for emerald and jade. The oils used are either natural or have a natural counterpart. If coloring agents are added to the oil, the stones are classified as dyed rather than oiled.

Opaque A term used for gemstones that you cannot see any light passing through the gem. Lapis, onyx and malachite are an example of this. Although recently color enhanced large size ruby, emeralds and opaque sapphires are available also.

Organic (gemstone) Most gemstones are minerals with a crystal structure but some gems, such as amber and pearl, are organic rather than mineral, being formed by plants and animals. See also Amorphous gemstones.

Padparadscha Derived from the Sinhalese term for “lotus flower,” padparadscha refers to a lush pink and orange sapphire resembling the color of the lotus. Padparadscha is also sometimes used to refer to other types of gemstones, such as topaz and tourmaline, with this unique coloration.

Paraiba: A rare copper-bearing tourmaline with an intense blue or blue-green color, first found in the state of Paraiba in Brazil in late 90’s. There have been recent finds in Central Africa of similar material, and the term “paraiba” is now used to refer to all examples of this copper-bearing tourmaline. See also Copper-bearing.

Pavilion: The lower portion of a gemstone that begins just below the girdle.

Pear Cut: Resembling a pear or teardrop, this fancy cut is rounded on one end and pointed on the other. Teardrop shaped stones are mostly used to make pendants.

Phenomenal Gems: Gems that display unusual optical properties such as color change, chatoyancy, asterism or iridescence. Alexandrite is one such example.

Pigeon’s Blood: Refers to the most prized color of red in rubies. Pigeon’s blood red is thought to be a pure red with a hint of blue. It is associated most with rubies from Burma, though any ruby could be this color.

Pleochroism: The ability of certain gems to display two or more colors when viewed from different angles. This is a term also used for Dichroism and trichroism.

Point: A gemstone unit weight equal to 1/100 of a carat.

Portuguese Cut: The portuguese cut refers to a particular type of faceting where the gem is cut with three rows (simple cut = two rows) of rhomboidal and two rows of triangular facets above the girdle (crown) and four rows of rhomboidal and one row of triangular facets below the girdle (pavilion). The portuguese cut thus has an extra row of facets on the crown, and this style enhances the brilliance of the gem. The portuguese cut is one of the most popular fancy cuts in the market and you’ll find many varieties of gems cut in this style.

Precious (gemstone): Traditionally, the four precious gemstones are diamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald. But other gems have also been labeled precious at times, including opal and amethyst. Today, the distinction between precious and semi-precious gems has been rejected by some gem trade associations. See also Semi-Precious gemstones.

Refraction: The bending of light as it enters a medium and slows down.

Refractive Index: A process using a refractometer to measure the speed and angle of light entering a gemstone. Very important for gem identification.

Rough: In gemology, this refers to the raw, natural state in which gems are found, before they are cut.

Rutiles: Needle-like inclusions (or foreign matter) within stones. These can produce some gem phenomena as an asterism (star) or cat’s eye (chatoyancy.)

Rubellite: Used to refer to the red variety of tourmaline, including the color range from pink to red. More of a marketing than a gemological term; these days gemologists tend to use simply “red tourmaline.”

Saturation: Saturation is one of three characteristics used to describe the appearance of color. Saturation (also known as intensity) refers to the brightness or vividness of a color. See also hue and tone.

Semi-precious (gemstone): Traditionally, the four precious gemstones arediamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald. Semi-precious gemstones include everything else. But other gems have also been labelled precious at times, including opal, amethyst and pearl. Today, the distinction between precious and semi-precious gems has been rejected by some gem trade associations.See also Precious gemstones.

Sheen: This effect resembles luster, and is caused by light reflection from inclusions or texture inside the gem. Luster is light reflected from the surface of the gem and sheen is reflection from inside the gemstone.

Side Stone (Accents): Side stones are set around or beside the center stone in a jewelry setting.

Single Cut: Stones with seventeen facets or fewer.

Single Refraction: Most gemstones are doubly refractive — they have 2 refractive indices. Only a few gemstones have a single refractive index, specifically diamond, spinel and garnet. See also Birefringence.

Solitaire: A solitaire, often found in rings and pendants, is a single stone in a simple setting

Species: The term used to designate a family of gemstones. For example, corundum is a species that contains the varieties sapphire and ruby. The Quartz family contains amethyst, citrine, and chalcedony, to name a few.

Specific Gravity: see density

Step Cut: As per gemstone terminology a step cut is referred to as a stone with rectangular facets along the perimeter.

Swiss Cut: A gemstone cut consisting of exactly thirty-three facets.

Synthetic (gemstone): A synthetic gemstone is man-made and has no traces of earth mined elements. Natural gemstones which are treated by industry-accepted methods such as heat, diffusion or irradiation are not classified as synthetic.

Table: The flat top part of a gemstone. The table is the largest facet.

Tone: One of 3 characteristics used to describe the appearance of color. Tone refers to the lightness or value of the lightness in a particular stone. See also Saturation and Hue.

Translucent: A quality of a gemstone transmitting light imperfectly so that one cannot see through the stone clearly. 

Transparent: There are several ways a light travels through a stone. In a transparent stone, the light travels through stone with generally zero distortion. Transparent stones are clear and easy to see through. 

Treated stone: A stone that has been heated, dyed, irradiated, or stained in order to improve the color or the clarity. Also pertains to gems that have their cracks or fractures concealed by filling the material.

Trichroism: A property of a stone that will show three colors or shades of the same color when the stone is viewed through a dichroscope.

Trillion Cut: A faceted cut in a triangular shape with 44 facets.

Vitreous A technical term referring to the luster of a gemstone. Gemstones with a vitreous or glassy luster are by far the most common in the gems world.

Waxy: One of the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. Turquoise and malachite are examples of gemstones with a waxy luster.

Window: In a well faceted gem, the pavilion facets (those on the lower half of the stone) should reflect light back out the top or table of the stone. If the facets are cut below the critical angle for the particular material, light will pass right through the stone instead of being reflected back towards your eye making the stone dull with barely any luster or brilliance.

Zoning (color zoning): A gemological term that describes the uneven distribution of color in a gemstone. Zoning is best seen when looking at the stone through the top table facet. This determines the pricing of a gemstone to a very large extent.

At Bello Jewels, we have made things very easy for you when you are planning to place an order at our online store. We understand how frustrating it can be when it comes to importing of gemstones and jewellery specially if you are located in the EU, Russia, Australia, South East Asia etc. For this we have tied up over the past decade with several logistics companies so you never have to face any problem with respect to paying taxes etc as we get your parcels cleared for you in your local region (valid for orders above $99).

For orders under US $ 99 we use Standard Indian Registered Post (7-15 days) and for orders above $ 99 we use express courier services (4-7 days) with our special no hassle import clearance.

If you place an order above $99 and are located in:

  • USA – Doorstep Delivery from India (UPS or USPS Express in most cases) or our Logistics Handler in NYC
  •  Canada – Doorstep Delivery from India (UPS or DHL in most cases) or our Logistics Handler in UK
  •  South America Continent (Brazil, Mexico etc) – Doorstep delivery from our Logistics Handler in South Africa or NYC, USA.
  •  Africa Continent (South Africa, Nigeria, Morocco etc) – Doorstep delivery from our Logistics Handler in South Africa (Express Post or Aramex)
  •  South East Asia (Malaysia, Singapore etc) and Australian Continent – Doorstep Delivery from India (UPS or USPS Express in most cases) or our Logistics Handler in London, UK.
  •  East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) – Doorstep Delivery from India (Aramex or DHL Express in most cases) or our Logistics Handler in London, UK
  •  Middle East (UAE, Saudi Arabia, Turkey etc) – Doorstep Delivery from India (Aramex or DHL Express in most cases) or our Logistics Handler in London, UK
  •   Russia and other Eastern Europe (Latvia, Slovenia, Ukraine, Poland) – Via our Logistics Handler in London, UK (DHL or Priority Post). 


At end of the day we have done everything possible to ensure your parcel reaches your doorstep and you face no custom problems/import taxes but even then there are certain situations beyond control for which we are here at your service. We delivery quicker in 9/10 cases than any of our competitors and will always ensure customer happiness!

Shipping is automatically calculated prior to submitting your payment information. Simply add items to your cart and proceed to the Checkout page where you will be offered Shipping Method choices and their prices.

We will ship your order shortly after we receive payment from you. 
We generally charge a flat fee of US $10 for orders under $ 99 and free shipping (express mode like UPS, Fedex or DHL) for orders above $100. 
In some case we are offering free shipping irrespective of the order amount. This will be marked clearly in the item description.

Within India we are offering free shipping irrespective of order value. You can place order by COD mode also – no extra charges would be levied

When purchasing a gemstone online or even physically in a retail store could be a difficult ordeal specially if you are a first time buyer. There are many factors which determine price of the stones. Below mentioned are some of the factors which influence pricing directly and indirectly.

Gemstone Shapes make a huge difference in pricing. Generally round, oval, cushion and princess cuts are most popular and everything else are lower pricing wise.


This chart is used mostly in case of loose white diamonds but also seldom used in colored gemstone purchases.



Some Gemstone Clarity Grading Examples which influence pricing directly.




We ship to more than 200+ countries across the globe. We have made arrangements with courier agents in USA, UK, Africa, South East Asia and Europe to ensure your parcels reach on time. 

Please create an account by clicking the “My Account / Order Status” link at the top right hand side of our site. During signup we’ll ask for your shipping address details including country. If your country is not in the dropdown menu of available countries, that means unfortunately we cannot ship to your country at this time.

Going by below system there should be a single standard value for ratti (gemstone measurement unit as per astrology) regardless of where you go. The fact is there is no official recognition of the ratti measurement system and there are several theories about the same.

We advice generally to choose a stone as per Carats and not Ratti when wearing a gemstone for astrological uses. Astrologers sometimes would insist on a 5.25 ratti, 6.25 ratti etc but you will never be able to find such a precise carat weight gemstone unless you get it cut and damage its luster/shine and in turn effectiveness.

Why we would give such a advice is because Ratti is an extremely inaccurate form of gemstone measurement. It was invented when there were no digital machines and precise instruments to weight an item. Picture this:

  • 1 Gram = 5 Carats
  • 1 Carat = 0.200 Grams
  • 1 Ratti = 121.5 mg as per ancient Ayurveda method
  • 1 Ratti = 182.25 mg as per some astrologers and texts

So what exactly is a Ratti?

Aratti is a traditional unit of mass measurement, and has now been standardized as 0.12125 gram. It was measured by ratti seed. This seed is actually “Abrus Precatorius” seed.

  • 1 tola = 12 masha or 11.67 gram
  • 1 masha = 8atti or 0.97 gram
  • 1 tank = 4 mashas or 3.88 gram
  • 1 Ratti = 0.6 Carat
  • 8 Ratti = 1 Gram

This Ratti System of measuring was popular in several parts of India before the adoption of the modern metric system. This system was not uniform all across India and several states of South India like Chennai and Hyderabad, Mumbai, Pune, West Bengal had different values of Ratti.

This is how ratti was used in ancient times:

  • 4 Chawal (grain of rice) = 1 Dhan (weight of one wheat berry)
  • 4 Dhan = 1 Ratti
  • 8 Ratti = 1 Masha
  • 12 Masha (96 Ratti) = 1 Tola
  • 24 Ratti (96 Dhan) = 1 Tak

If you consider all of the above you will understand that Ratti has very less significance. Choose a gemstone based on clarity, colour, luster, carat weight and obviously what your pocket allows you which doesn’t burden you financially. Idea for an Astrological Gemstone is to give you various benefits attached to the same and help you solve any problems you might be facing in your life.

Astrology is an important part of our life as we know it and goes back to the early days of human existence. Apart from being centers of learning in medicine & science, Baghdad and Damascus were also known as centers of astrology and astronomy. Arabs were pioneers in astronomy before the advent of Islam. The Babylonians were the first to name the days of the week after the Sun, Moon, and planets. They were also the first to set out the twelve houses of the horoscope which we use in our modern astrological softwares and horoscope calculations today. Egypt was one of the most important places in the development of astrology. It is thought that some of the astrological signs of the zodiac originated in Egypt.

Gemstones and their Association with Zodiac Signs:

 

Astrology is being practiced since the Vedic/Ancient times and know there are several teaching centers all across India and now in USA, UK, China, Japan and many countries across Europe. Astrology is one of the six disciplines of vedanga. The Hindus believe that human fortune or misfortune in life is due to karma, and karma is believed to be influenced by the movements of the planets in the solar system. Among the Hindus, Brahmins are considered to be the best authorities on astrology. Most of the astrology teachers are also Brahmins. It is regarded as vital in Indian culture. It is used to make decisions about marriage, starting of new business, and moving into a new house etc. Ancient Hindu Scriptures too gives a lot of importance to the various aspects of planetary motions and its effects on humans. 

Gemstones and their Association with Planets:

  • Mercury – Emerald, Green Onyx
  • Uranus – Aquamarine
  • Venus – Diamond, Jade
  • Neptune – Opal, Amethyst
  • Earth – Agate, Onyx
  • Pluto – Kunzite, Spinel
  • Mars – Red Coral, Garnet, Bloodstone
  • Moon – Pearls, Moonstone
  • Jupiter – Citrine, Yellow Sapphire
  • Sun – Ruby, Golden Topaz
  • Saturn – Sapphire, Kyanite, Iolite

Gemstones and their Association with Vedic Astrology:

 

The Gemstone Index

Adamantine: Refers to the diamond-like luster of a gemstone. Gemstones with a diamond-like luster include natural white diamond.

Adularescence: The shimmering light or whitish opalescence which shows up over the surface of some gems such as moonstone.

Alluvial Deposits: Gemstone deposits found in water after they have been separated from the main rough rock.

Amorphous: Gemstones without a crystal structure are referred to as amorphous. These include stones such as red coral, opal and freshwater pearls.

Asterism: The star effect that you see in star sapphires or star rubies, for example. This is usually caused by tiny silk rutile inclusions in the stone. The effect is generally six- rayed.

Baguette: A long rectangular gemstone shape, somewhat similar in shape to a loaf of French bread, hence the name.

Baroque Brilliant Cut: A round shaped stone that has 58 facets or more.

Bead: A gemstone with drilled hole in center or top mostly, usually round, designed to be strung.

Beryllium Treatment: A form of heat treatment for sapphires that adds the element beryllium to the heating process. Beryllium is an element well known in the gem world, since it is an essential constituent in many gemstones, including emerald and aquamarine. When sapphires are heated with beryllium, the result is a reduction in blue tones. Thus bright yellow or orange sapphire can be produced from weak yellow or greenish gems. Some stunning colors have been produced using this method.

Bi-color: A gemstone exhibiting two color zones, such as ametrine or tourmalines. In case of Ametrine for example you will see both violet and yellow infused together by nature.`

Birefringence: Some gemstones are singly refractive: they have only one refractive index. Other gemstones (in fact, most) are doubly refractive: they have two different refractive indices. When a beam of light enters a doubly refractive gem, it is split into two beams, each travelling at a different speed and on a different path through the crystal. Birefringence is a measurement of the difference between the two refractive indices in gems that are doubly refractive, and it ranges from a low of .003 to a high of .287. Very few gemstones are singly refractive; in fact, the only well-known gems with that property are diamond, spinel and garnet.

Birthstone: The association of gemstones with vedic astrology goes back centuries. More recently, jewelers have adapted this tradition to create a list of birthstones. Remember that a Birthstone is a Gemstone but a gemstone may not be a birthstone. For Example:

Yellow Sapphire is referred to as Pukhraj in Indian Astrology so it’s a Birthstone

Blue Topaz is a beautiful gemstone but not included anywhere in the Birthstone Index

Brilliance: The reflection and refraction of light displayed through a gemstone. Brilliance is sometimes referred to as “internal shine or luster” to distinguish it from surface luster.

Briolette: A teardrop or pear-shaped stone cut in triangular facets. Mostly used to created necklaces.

Cabochon Cut: A gem that is cut round without facets into the shape of a smooth polished dome. It lacks the facets that are on most stones and smooth to touch.

Calibrated (size): Many gemstones are sold in calibrated or standard sizes that will fit jewelry mountings. Standard sizes are calibrated in millimeters for a number of different gem shapes.

Carat: A unit of weight for gemstones. A carat is one fifth of a gram. So a 5Carat Stone = 1 Gram.

Cat’s Eye and Chatoyancy: The cat’s eye effect sometimes seen in gemstones such as chrysoberyl and apatite is known by the gemological name of chatoyancy. The effect is caused by tiny parallel inclusions that give the appearance of a narrow line similar to an eye of a cat. Often a gemstone needs to be viewed in natural light or under a pen-light to see the chatoyancy effect.

Center Stone: The center stone is the prominent center piece in a jewelry setting that has multiple gemstones. In case of engagement rings the main diamond is the center stone.

Clarity: Referring to the kind of inclusions present in a gemstone or other defects seen by naked eye or under a microscope it might have.

Cleavage: The plane of weakness of some gems where they will split apart with smooth surfaces. Gems with perfect cleavage are likely to break when being cut or faceted.

Color: Used in the evaluation of a gem. The quality or pricing of a gem can determined on either the presence or the absence of color.

Color Change: Color change gemstones change color due to changing light conditions or when under a pen-light (such as alexandrite or color change sapphire) or when viewed from different angles (such as andalusite or iolite).

Concave Cut: Traditional gem facets are flat or two-dimensional. Concave cutting creates facets that are curved or three-dimensional. These curved facets refract more of the ambient light and return it to the eye as brilliance. Concave cutting is a very recent gemstone faceting style. It requires considerable expertise and results in higher weight loss to the rough stone, since more material must be cut away to create the curved facets.

Crown: The top of a gemstone above the girdle. This terminology is used in the manufacturing process or when evaluating prices on a diamond in most cases.

Copper-bearing or Cuprian: Gemstones that contain traces of copper are very rare and typically have a intense-unique blue, blue-green or violet color. The first copper-bearing gemstones were discovered in late 90’s. Paraiba Copper Bearing tourmaline is one such example. 

Corundum: A crystalline form of aluminum oxide. Commonly referred to as ruby and sapphire in the gem world. It is found in clear and opaque forms, but can have different colors when impurities are present. Corundum is much admired for its hardness (9.0 on the Mohs scale), luster and rareness.

Cubic zirconia: A lab created diamond simulant, often abbreviated as CZ. While CZ is a transparent stone, trace elements can be added to the manufacturing process, producing a wide range of colors. On Mohs scale of hardness, a good quality CZ is harder than other gemstones except for diamond, ruby, sapphire and chrysoberyl. Not to be confused with Zircon, a natural gemstone mined from the earth and much more expensive.

Culet: The lowest part of a gemstone. This looks the tip or point of the stone.

Demantoid: A natural earth mined demantoid is a rare and valuable andradite garnet. It exhibits a range of greens from dull to bright emerald green and on rare occasions displays yellow. On Mohs scale of hardness, demantoid is relatively soft at 6.5. It has an adamantine luster.

Density or Specific Gravity: The ratio of a gemstone when compared to the weight of an equal volume of water. This means how heavy a gemstone is compared to the same volume of water. Also known as “specific gravity” for solids.

Diamond Cut: Also known as the Brilliant Cut or Round Brilliant Cut (RBC), the style of cutting a stone with multiple facets to maximize brilliance. Modern round brilliant cuts have 58 facets.

Dichroism: A term meaning the ability of some gems to display a second shade of the same color when viewed from a different angle. A dichroscope can see this change, and is used for identifying certain stone.

Diffusion Treatment: A form of heat treatment that adds one or more chemicals to the heating process to change the color of a gemstone. Typically the treatment does not penetrate deep into the stone, so gems treated in this way cannot be recut. Diffusion treatment is most commonly used in treating sapphires.

Dispersion: The property of a transparent stone to split light into the seven spectral/rainbow type colors, causing the “fire/luster” which is refracted by the internal facets. Diamond has a very high dispersion, hence it has high amount of fire/luster.

Double Refraction: The ability of most gems to split rays of light into two rays.

Doublet: A doublet is a gemstone composed of valuable gemstone material in combination with other materials. It is found most often in opal, where an opal doublet contains a slice of opal glued to common opal, glass or other material. A triplet contains a slice of opal glued between a base and a crystal or a glass top. Triplets are usually less expensive than doublets, and both are less expensive than natural opals. Doublets may occasionally be found with sapphire or other expensive gemstones.

Eye Clean: Refers to a gemstone that appears to have no visible inclusions or imperfections to the naked eye.

Facet: The cut and polished flat plane of a gemstone. There can be dozens of facets on a stone depending upon the rough in front of a cutter.

Fancy Cut: Gemstones are sometimes cut in non gemological shape other than the standard round or oval cut, but also used to refer to gemstones that are cut in a shape other than the well known shapes of round, oval, pear, trillion, marquise, etc.

Fire: The rainbow or colors that light rays form as they move through a gemstone. This is another word for “dispersion” in a gemstone.

Fissure: A surface crack or nick on a gemstone. Gems with fissures may be Fracture Filled to improve its appearance.

Fluorescence: The ability of some gems to appear a different color when viewed under ultraviolet light. If or not a stone has fluorescence is a valuable aid in gem identification.

Fracture Filling: Small cracks or fissures in a gemstone can interrupt the flow of light through the stone, creating white or “dead” spots in the color of the stone. Sometimes these fractures will be filled with material that will allow the light to pass through smoothly. Different materials are used; oil, wax, glass, epoxy, and borax are common materials. The most commonly filled stones are emerald and ruby.

Full Cut: A round-shaped or brilliant-cut gemstone.

Girdle: The widest point in circumference of a gem. This is the point where a gem is usually held by fingers or tweezers for examination.

Greasy (luster): One of the the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. Jadeite is an example of a gem with a greasy luster.

Heat Treatment: The application of high heat to a gemstone in order to improve its color and clarity.

Hue: Refers to the position of a color on the color wheel, or the dominant wavelength of color attributed to a gemstone. There are six primary hues: violet, blue, green, yellow, orange, and red. In between these primary hues are secondary hues, such as blue-green. See also tone and saturation

Inclusions: Foreign matter that is “included” within a stone. This may be a foreign body such as a crystal, a gas bubble or a pocket of liquid. There are many varieties of inclusions and they are important visual clues for identifying the type of gemstone and for identifying the origin of the stone.

Indicolite: Blue tourmaline. From bright blue hues to bluish green colors,indicolite tourmaline is one of the rarer tourmaline colors.

Iridescence: Effect caused by the interference of light on thin films within the gemstone.

Irradiation: Exposing gemstones to radioactive rays from x-rays or other material to change or enhance the original color. Blue topaz is always irradiated, for example.

Karat (Metal): Karat (as distinguished from Carat) is a measure of the purity of gold. Most gold jewelry is actually made from a gold alloy containing gold and another metal or metals. 18K gold, for example, is 75% pure gold.

Lab created: Refers to gemstones created in a laboratory rather than by nature. A lab created gemstone is typically the same material chemically as its natural counterpart, as in the case of corundum produced by flame fusion orquartz grown using the hydrothermal method.

Lapidary: The science and art of cutting and polishing gems to their finished state.

Loupe Clean: A gemstone is said to be Loupe Clean when no inclusions or defects are visible when the gem is viewed with 10 times magnification. See also Eye Clean.

Luster: The outward appearance of a gem or organic material. The quantity and quality of light that is reflected from the surface of a stone. Luster is important especially when evaluating the quality of pearls.

Marquise: The marquise shape is an elongated oval with points on both ends. Said to be named after the Marquise de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV.

Metallic (luster): One of the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. A gemstone that is reflective like polished metal is said to have a metallic luster. Hematite is one of the rare examples.

Mohs Hardness Scale: Numerical scale ranging from 1 to 10 developed by Friedrich Mohs that assigns a rating to a gem according to its ability to resist scratching. The hardest is 10 (diamond) and the softest is 1 (talc).

Synthetic Moissanite A lab-created diamond simulant based on the structure of natural moissanite. On Mohs’ scale of hardness, moissanite is 9.5. It has more brilliance, fire and luster than any hard jewel on earth, including diamond.

Oiling Oiling infuses colorless oils, resins or waxes into tiny surface-breaking fissures to hide them and give certain gemstones a cleaner appearance. This long-practiced clarity enhancement is used mainly for emerald and jade. The oils used are either natural or have a natural counterpart. If coloring agents are added to the oil, the stones are classified as dyed rather than oiled.

Opaque A term used for gemstones that you cannot see any light passing through the gem. Lapis, onyx and malachite are an example of this. Although recently color enhanced large size ruby, emeralds and opaque sapphires are available also.

Organic (gemstone) Most gemstones are minerals with a crystal structure but some gems, such as amber and pearl, are organic rather than mineral, being formed by plants and animals. See also Amorphous gemstones.

Padparadscha Derived from the Sinhalese term for “lotus flower,” padparadscha refers to a lush pink and orange sapphire resembling the color of the lotus. Padparadscha is also sometimes used to refer to other types of gemstones, such as topaz and tourmaline, with this unique coloration.

Paraiba: A rare copper-bearing tourmaline with an intense blue or blue-green color, first found in the state of Paraiba in Brazil in late 90’s. There have been recent finds in Central Africa of similar material, and the term “paraiba” is now used to refer to all examples of this copper-bearing tourmaline. See also Copper-bearing.

Pavilion: The lower portion of a gemstone that begins just below the girdle.

Pear Cut: Resembling a pear or teardrop, this fancy cut is rounded on one end and pointed on the other. Teardrop shaped stones are mostly used to make pendants.

Phenomenal Gems: Gems that display unusual optical properties such as color change, chatoyancy, asterism or iridescence. Alexandrite is one such example.

Pigeon’s Blood: Refers to the most prized color of red in rubies. Pigeon’s blood red is thought to be a pure red with a hint of blue. It is associated most with rubies from Burma, though any ruby could be this color.

Pleochroism: The ability of certain gems to display two or more colors when viewed from different angles. This is a term also used for Dichroism and trichroism.

Point: A gemstone unit weight equal to 1/100 of a carat.

Portuguese Cut: The portuguese cut refers to a particular type of faceting where the gem is cut with three rows (simple cut = two rows) of rhomboidal and two rows of triangular facets above the girdle (crown) and four rows of rhomboidal and one row of triangular facets below the girdle (pavilion). The portuguese cut thus has an extra row of facets on the crown, and this style enhances the brilliance of the gem. The portuguese cut is one of the most popular fancy cuts in the market and you’ll find many varieties of gems cut in this style.

Precious (gemstone): Traditionally, the four precious gemstones are diamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald. But other gems have also been labeled precious at times, including opal and amethyst. Today, the distinction between precious and semi-precious gems has been rejected by some gem trade associations. See also Semi-Precious gemstones.

Refraction: The bending of light as it enters a medium and slows down.

Refractive Index: A process using a refractometer to measure the speed and angle of light entering a gemstone. Very important for gem identification.

Rough: In gemology, this refers to the raw, natural state in which gems are found, before they are cut.

Rutiles: Needle-like inclusions (or foreign matter) within stones. These can produce some gem phenomena as an asterism (star) or cat’s eye (chatoyancy.)

Rubellite: Used to refer to the red variety of tourmaline, including the color range from pink to red. More of a marketing than a gemological term; these days gemologists tend to use simply “red tourmaline.”

Saturation: Saturation is one of three characteristics used to describe the appearance of color. Saturation (also known as intensity) refers to the brightness or vividness of a color. See also hue and tone.

Semi-precious (gemstone): Traditionally, the four precious gemstones arediamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald. Semi-precious gemstones include everything else. But other gems have also been labelled precious at times, including opal, amethyst and pearl. Today, the distinction between precious and semi-precious gems has been rejected by some gem trade associations.See also Precious gemstones.

Sheen: This effect resembles luster, and is caused by light reflection from inclusions or texture inside the gem. Luster is light reflected from the surface of the gem and sheen is reflection from inside the gemstone.

Side Stone (Accents): Side stones are set around or beside the center stone in a jewelry setting.

Single Cut: Stones with seventeen facets or fewer.

Single Refraction: Most gemstones are doubly refractive — they have 2 refractive indices. Only a few gemstones have a single refractive index, specifically diamond, spinel and garnet. See also Birefringence.

Solitaire: A solitaire, often found in rings and pendants, is a single stone in a simple setting

Species: The term used to designate a family of gemstones. For example, corundum is a species that contains the varieties sapphire and ruby. The Quartz family contains amethyst, citrine, and chalcedony, to name a few.

Specific Gravity: see density

Step Cut: As per gemstone terminology a step cut is referred to as a stone with rectangular facets along the perimeter.

Swiss Cut: A gemstone cut consisting of exactly thirty-three facets.

Synthetic (gemstone): A synthetic gemstone is man-made and has no traces of earth mined elements. Natural gemstones which are treated by industry-accepted methods such as heat, diffusion or irradiation are not classified as synthetic.

Table: The flat top part of a gemstone. The table is the largest facet.

Tone: One of 3 characteristics used to describe the appearance of color. Tone refers to the lightness or value of the lightness in a particular stone. See also Saturation and Hue.

Translucent: A quality of a gemstone transmitting light imperfectly so that one cannot see through the stone clearly. 

Transparent: There are several ways a light travels through a stone. In a transparent stone, the light travels through stone with generally zero distortion. Transparent stones are clear and easy to see through. 

Treated stone: A stone that has been heated, dyed, irradiated, or stained in order to improve the color or the clarity. Also pertains to gems that have their cracks or fractures concealed by filling the material.

Trichroism: A property of a stone that will show three colors or shades of the same color when the stone is viewed through a dichroscope.

Trillion Cut: A faceted cut in a triangular shape with 44 facets.

Vitreous A technical term referring to the luster of a gemstone. Gemstones with a vitreous or glassy luster are by far the most common in the gems world.

Waxy: One of the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. Turquoise and malachite are examples of gemstones with a waxy luster.

Window: In a well faceted gem, the pavilion facets (those on the lower half of the stone) should reflect light back out the top or table of the stone. If the facets are cut below the critical angle for the particular material, light will pass right through the stone instead of being reflected back towards your eye making the stone dull with barely any luster or brilliance.

Zoning (color zoning): A gemological term that describes the uneven distribution of color in a gemstone. Zoning is best seen when looking at the stone through the top table facet. This determines the pricing of a gemstone to a very large extent.

When purchasing a gemstone online or even physically in a retail store could be a difficult ordeal specially if you are a first time buyer. There are many factors which determine price of the stones. Below mentioned are some of the factors which influence pricing directly and indirectly.

Gemstone Shapes make a huge difference in pricing. Generally round, oval, cushion and princess cuts are most popular and everything else are lower pricing wise.


This chart is used mostly in case of loose white diamonds but also seldom used in colored gemstone purchases.



Some Gemstone Clarity Grading Examples which influence pricing directly.




Click the “My Account / Order Status” link at the top right hand side of our site to track your order status. Be sure that all of the items in your order have shipped already. If you order displays your Package Tracking Numbers, check with the us to confirm that your packages were delivered. If your packages show a status of “delivered” and not as described or something is missing, please contact us for assistance.

At bellojewelsonline.com you can bid in two different ways. 

1) One way is to directly bid the next possible amount, be outbid, then bid again and you continue in this way until one party withdraws. This is called “Standard Bid”

2) Or you can select the maximum amount you are willing to pay for a particular gemstone, jewel, rudrakshas on our website. We call this service “Auto-bid”.

  1. You select the maximum bid you want to bid for the item.
  2. You click on  “Bid’
  3. You will be asked to confirm the bid.
  4. bellojewelsonline.com will then automatically bid each time you are outbid until the amount surpasses your pre-set limit. This service ensures that the computer does the bidding for you and that it will never bid over your maximum bid amount. It will always bid the least amount possible to outbid other bidders.
  5. It is possible to change your Auto-bid. 
    1) You can either raise it in case you decide to bid more for the lot, or in case you are outbid. 
    2) Or you can lower your Auto-bid again as long as the auction has not reached your pre-set limit. 

    For example, if the current highest bid is 1000 and you earlier have placed a Auto-bid of 2,500, you can change your Auto-bid to 1,500.

You will never bid yourself up. 

Can two customers place the same Auto-bid? Auto-bid works on a first come, first serve basis. For example, if two customers place a bid of precisely the same amount, the one that was placed first will ultimately win the auction. This means that an interested buyer who places a Auto-bid of 1,500 on a lot will ultimately win over a direct bid of the same amount placed at a later date, because the Auto-bid was registered first. Have two customers placed the same Auto-bid, both bids will be shown in the Prior bids list, the decisive factor is again the time the bid was placed. 

Information about your bid via e-mail 
You will receive an e-mail from bellojewelsonline.com when you bid, if you are outbid, and if you win the auction. However, bellojewelsonline.com cannot be held responsible for external factors delaying or preventing the e-mail from reaching you. 

Please note that if you are outbid within the last remaining minutes of an auction it is possible that you will not manage to get the e-mail informing you about this before the end of the auction. Therefore we recommend that you personally participate in the last minutes of the auction to avoid any disappointment. 

We at bellojewelsonline.com want to ensure a fair and safe auction environment. We will under NO Circumstances Bid on our own items. We have validation from several hundred customers who have won gemstones, jewels and rudrakshas from INR 1 to INR 50000. 

When you are at your home and ordering a ring online it could be tricky to get the correct ring size specially if there is no jeweller around you or you do not have time. 
See below images if you want to find your ring size or just want to do a quick conversion when placing an order online at our store.

Ring “mm” Size Finder (If you do not know the size just wrap a thread around your finger and provide us the mm size after placing your order.

Remember the difference between Circumference and Diameter mm size!

International Ring Size Conversion Chart (Japanese and Indian Size is Same)


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In either of the above mentioned cases please create a “support ticket/contact us” immediately and we will get back within few hours and help you by manually sending you a payment link or explain other options.

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We offer the following payment options for our clients living within India (All States):

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We offer the following payment options for our clients living outside India:

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We offer a “No Questions Asked” 14 days money back guarantee. 
This guarantee is limited to amount paid excluding any shipping amount. The return shipping cost (please use priority postal service only for shipping) is borne by buyer. In some cases we can arrange a reverse pick-up at no additional charge if you are located in India.

Conditions for Money Back Guarantee

  • The articles should be in the exact same condition at the time we shipped you and if box packing was included, you will have to return the same as well.
  • If you have got a custom jewel made then under no circumstances the making charges will be refunded and gemstone re-stocking fee of upto 25% may be applied .

At Bello Jewels, we have made things very easy for you when you are planning to place an order at our online store. We understand how frustrating it can be when it comes to importing of gemstones and jewellery specially if you are located in the EU, Russia, Australia, South East Asia etc. For this we have tied up over the past decade with several logistics companies so you never have to face any problem with respect to paying taxes etc as we get your parcels cleared for you in your local region (valid for orders above $99).

For orders under US $ 99 we use Standard Indian Registered Post (7-15 days) and for orders above $ 99 we use express courier services (4-7 days) with our special no hassle import clearance.

If you place an order above $99 and are located in:

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Going by below system there should be a single standard value for ratti (gemstone measurement unit as per astrology) regardless of where you go. The fact is there is no official recognition of the ratti measurement system and there are several theories about the same.

We advice generally to choose a stone as per Carats and not Ratti when wearing a gemstone for astrological uses. Astrologers sometimes would insist on a 5.25 ratti, 6.25 ratti etc but you will never be able to find such a precise carat weight gemstone unless you get it cut and damage its luster/shine and in turn effectiveness.

Why we would give such a advice is because Ratti is an extremely inaccurate form of gemstone measurement. It was invented when there were no digital machines and precise instruments to weight an item. Picture this:

  • 1 Gram = 5 Carats
  • 1 Carat = 0.200 Grams
  • 1 Ratti = 121.5 mg as per ancient Ayurveda method
  • 1 Ratti = 182.25 mg as per some astrologers and texts

So what exactly is a Ratti?

Aratti is a traditional unit of mass measurement, and has now been standardized as 0.12125 gram. It was measured by ratti seed. This seed is actually “Abrus Precatorius” seed.

  • 1 tola = 12 masha or 11.67 gram
  • 1 masha = 8atti or 0.97 gram
  • 1 tank = 4 mashas or 3.88 gram
  • 1 Ratti = 0.6 Carat
  • 8 Ratti = 1 Gram

This Ratti System of measuring was popular in several parts of India before the adoption of the modern metric system. This system was not uniform all across India and several states of South India like Chennai and Hyderabad, Mumbai, Pune, West Bengal had different values of Ratti.

This is how ratti was used in ancient times:

  • 4 Chawal (grain of rice) = 1 Dhan (weight of one wheat berry)
  • 4 Dhan = 1 Ratti
  • 8 Ratti = 1 Masha
  • 12 Masha (96 Ratti) = 1 Tola
  • 24 Ratti (96 Dhan) = 1 Tak

If you consider all of the above you will understand that Ratti has very less significance. Choose a gemstone based on clarity, colour, luster, carat weight and obviously what your pocket allows you which doesn’t burden you financially. Idea for an Astrological Gemstone is to give you various benefits attached to the same and help you solve any problems you might be facing in your life.

Astrology is an important part of our life as we know it and goes back to the early days of human existence. Apart from being centers of learning in medicine & science, Baghdad and Damascus were also known as centers of astrology and astronomy. Arabs were pioneers in astronomy before the advent of Islam. The Babylonians were the first to name the days of the week after the Sun, Moon, and planets. They were also the first to set out the twelve houses of the horoscope which we use in our modern astrological softwares and horoscope calculations today. Egypt was one of the most important places in the development of astrology. It is thought that some of the astrological signs of the zodiac originated in Egypt.

Gemstones and their Association with Zodiac Signs:

 

Astrology is being practiced since the Vedic/Ancient times and know there are several teaching centers all across India and now in USA, UK, China, Japan and many countries across Europe. Astrology is one of the six disciplines of vedanga. The Hindus believe that human fortune or misfortune in life is due to karma, and karma is believed to be influenced by the movements of the planets in the solar system. Among the Hindus, Brahmins are considered to be the best authorities on astrology. Most of the astrology teachers are also Brahmins. It is regarded as vital in Indian culture. It is used to make decisions about marriage, starting of new business, and moving into a new house etc. Ancient Hindu Scriptures too gives a lot of importance to the various aspects of planetary motions and its effects on humans. 

Gemstones and their Association with Planets:

  • Mercury – Emerald, Green Onyx
  • Uranus – Aquamarine
  • Venus – Diamond, Jade
  • Neptune – Opal, Amethyst
  • Earth – Agate, Onyx
  • Pluto – Kunzite, Spinel
  • Mars – Red Coral, Garnet, Bloodstone
  • Moon – Pearls, Moonstone
  • Jupiter – Citrine, Yellow Sapphire
  • Sun – Ruby, Golden Topaz
  • Saturn – Sapphire, Kyanite, Iolite

Gemstones and their Association with Vedic Astrology:

 

The Gemstone Index

Adamantine: Refers to the diamond-like luster of a gemstone. Gemstones with a diamond-like luster include natural white diamond.

Adularescence: The shimmering light or whitish opalescence which shows up over the surface of some gems such as moonstone.

Alluvial Deposits: Gemstone deposits found in water after they have been separated from the main rough rock.

Amorphous: Gemstones without a crystal structure are referred to as amorphous. These include stones such as red coral, opal and freshwater pearls.

Asterism: The star effect that you see in star sapphires or star rubies, for example. This is usually caused by tiny silk rutile inclusions in the stone. The effect is generally six- rayed.

Baguette: A long rectangular gemstone shape, somewhat similar in shape to a loaf of French bread, hence the name.

Baroque Brilliant Cut: A round shaped stone that has 58 facets or more.

Bead: A gemstone with drilled hole in center or top mostly, usually round, designed to be strung.

Beryllium Treatment: A form of heat treatment for sapphires that adds the element beryllium to the heating process. Beryllium is an element well known in the gem world, since it is an essential constituent in many gemstones, including emerald and aquamarine. When sapphires are heated with beryllium, the result is a reduction in blue tones. Thus bright yellow or orange sapphire can be produced from weak yellow or greenish gems. Some stunning colors have been produced using this method.

Bi-color: A gemstone exhibiting two color zones, such as ametrine or tourmalines. In case of Ametrine for example you will see both violet and yellow infused together by nature.`

Birefringence: Some gemstones are singly refractive: they have only one refractive index. Other gemstones (in fact, most) are doubly refractive: they have two different refractive indices. When a beam of light enters a doubly refractive gem, it is split into two beams, each travelling at a different speed and on a different path through the crystal. Birefringence is a measurement of the difference between the two refractive indices in gems that are doubly refractive, and it ranges from a low of .003 to a high of .287. Very few gemstones are singly refractive; in fact, the only well-known gems with that property are diamond, spinel and garnet.

Birthstone: The association of gemstones with vedic astrology goes back centuries. More recently, jewelers have adapted this tradition to create a list of birthstones. Remember that a Birthstone is a Gemstone but a gemstone may not be a birthstone. For Example:

Yellow Sapphire is referred to as Pukhraj in Indian Astrology so it’s a Birthstone

Blue Topaz is a beautiful gemstone but not included anywhere in the Birthstone Index

Brilliance: The reflection and refraction of light displayed through a gemstone. Brilliance is sometimes referred to as “internal shine or luster” to distinguish it from surface luster.

Briolette: A teardrop or pear-shaped stone cut in triangular facets. Mostly used to created necklaces.

Cabochon Cut: A gem that is cut round without facets into the shape of a smooth polished dome. It lacks the facets that are on most stones and smooth to touch.

Calibrated (size): Many gemstones are sold in calibrated or standard sizes that will fit jewelry mountings. Standard sizes are calibrated in millimeters for a number of different gem shapes.

Carat: A unit of weight for gemstones. A carat is one fifth of a gram. So a 5Carat Stone = 1 Gram.

Cat’s Eye and Chatoyancy: The cat’s eye effect sometimes seen in gemstones such as chrysoberyl and apatite is known by the gemological name of chatoyancy. The effect is caused by tiny parallel inclusions that give the appearance of a narrow line similar to an eye of a cat. Often a gemstone needs to be viewed in natural light or under a pen-light to see the chatoyancy effect.

Center Stone: The center stone is the prominent center piece in a jewelry setting that has multiple gemstones. In case of engagement rings the main diamond is the center stone.

Clarity: Referring to the kind of inclusions present in a gemstone or other defects seen by naked eye or under a microscope it might have.

Cleavage: The plane of weakness of some gems where they will split apart with smooth surfaces. Gems with perfect cleavage are likely to break when being cut or faceted.

Color: Used in the evaluation of a gem. The quality or pricing of a gem can determined on either the presence or the absence of color.

Color Change: Color change gemstones change color due to changing light conditions or when under a pen-light (such as alexandrite or color change sapphire) or when viewed from different angles (such as andalusite or iolite).

Concave Cut: Traditional gem facets are flat or two-dimensional. Concave cutting creates facets that are curved or three-dimensional. These curved facets refract more of the ambient light and return it to the eye as brilliance. Concave cutting is a very recent gemstone faceting style. It requires considerable expertise and results in higher weight loss to the rough stone, since more material must be cut away to create the curved facets.

Crown: The top of a gemstone above the girdle. This terminology is used in the manufacturing process or when evaluating prices on a diamond in most cases.

Copper-bearing or Cuprian: Gemstones that contain traces of copper are very rare and typically have a intense-unique blue, blue-green or violet color. The first copper-bearing gemstones were discovered in late 90’s. Paraiba Copper Bearing tourmaline is one such example. 

Corundum: A crystalline form of aluminum oxide. Commonly referred to as ruby and sapphire in the gem world. It is found in clear and opaque forms, but can have different colors when impurities are present. Corundum is much admired for its hardness (9.0 on the Mohs scale), luster and rareness.

Cubic zirconia: A lab created diamond simulant, often abbreviated as CZ. While CZ is a transparent stone, trace elements can be added to the manufacturing process, producing a wide range of colors. On Mohs scale of hardness, a good quality CZ is harder than other gemstones except for diamond, ruby, sapphire and chrysoberyl. Not to be confused with Zircon, a natural gemstone mined from the earth and much more expensive.

Culet: The lowest part of a gemstone. This looks the tip or point of the stone.

Demantoid: A natural earth mined demantoid is a rare and valuable andradite garnet. It exhibits a range of greens from dull to bright emerald green and on rare occasions displays yellow. On Mohs scale of hardness, demantoid is relatively soft at 6.5. It has an adamantine luster.

Density or Specific Gravity: The ratio of a gemstone when compared to the weight of an equal volume of water. This means how heavy a gemstone is compared to the same volume of water. Also known as “specific gravity” for solids.

Diamond Cut: Also known as the Brilliant Cut or Round Brilliant Cut (RBC), the style of cutting a stone with multiple facets to maximize brilliance. Modern round brilliant cuts have 58 facets.

Dichroism: A term meaning the ability of some gems to display a second shade of the same color when viewed from a different angle. A dichroscope can see this change, and is used for identifying certain stone.

Diffusion Treatment: A form of heat treatment that adds one or more chemicals to the heating process to change the color of a gemstone. Typically the treatment does not penetrate deep into the stone, so gems treated in this way cannot be recut. Diffusion treatment is most commonly used in treating sapphires.

Dispersion: The property of a transparent stone to split light into the seven spectral/rainbow type colors, causing the “fire/luster” which is refracted by the internal facets. Diamond has a very high dispersion, hence it has high amount of fire/luster.

Double Refraction: The ability of most gems to split rays of light into two rays.

Doublet: A doublet is a gemstone composed of valuable gemstone material in combination with other materials. It is found most often in opal, where an opal doublet contains a slice of opal glued to common opal, glass or other material. A triplet contains a slice of opal glued between a base and a crystal or a glass top. Triplets are usually less expensive than doublets, and both are less expensive than natural opals. Doublets may occasionally be found with sapphire or other expensive gemstones.

Eye Clean: Refers to a gemstone that appears to have no visible inclusions or imperfections to the naked eye.

Facet: The cut and polished flat plane of a gemstone. There can be dozens of facets on a stone depending upon the rough in front of a cutter.

Fancy Cut: Gemstones are sometimes cut in non gemological shape other than the standard round or oval cut, but also used to refer to gemstones that are cut in a shape other than the well known shapes of round, oval, pear, trillion, marquise, etc.

Fire: The rainbow or colors that light rays form as they move through a gemstone. This is another word for “dispersion” in a gemstone.

Fissure: A surface crack or nick on a gemstone. Gems with fissures may be Fracture Filled to improve its appearance.

Fluorescence: The ability of some gems to appear a different color when viewed under ultraviolet light. If or not a stone has fluorescence is a valuable aid in gem identification.

Fracture Filling: Small cracks or fissures in a gemstone can interrupt the flow of light through the stone, creating white or “dead” spots in the color of the stone. Sometimes these fractures will be filled with material that will allow the light to pass through smoothly. Different materials are used; oil, wax, glass, epoxy, and borax are common materials. The most commonly filled stones are emerald and ruby.

Full Cut: A round-shaped or brilliant-cut gemstone.

Girdle: The widest point in circumference of a gem. This is the point where a gem is usually held by fingers or tweezers for examination.

Greasy (luster): One of the the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. Jadeite is an example of a gem with a greasy luster.

Heat Treatment: The application of high heat to a gemstone in order to improve its color and clarity.

Hue: Refers to the position of a color on the color wheel, or the dominant wavelength of color attributed to a gemstone. There are six primary hues: violet, blue, green, yellow, orange, and red. In between these primary hues are secondary hues, such as blue-green. See also tone and saturation

Inclusions: Foreign matter that is “included” within a stone. This may be a foreign body such as a crystal, a gas bubble or a pocket of liquid. There are many varieties of inclusions and they are important visual clues for identifying the type of gemstone and for identifying the origin of the stone.

Indicolite: Blue tourmaline. From bright blue hues to bluish green colors,indicolite tourmaline is one of the rarer tourmaline colors.

Iridescence: Effect caused by the interference of light on thin films within the gemstone.

Irradiation: Exposing gemstones to radioactive rays from x-rays or other material to change or enhance the original color. Blue topaz is always irradiated, for example.

Karat (Metal): Karat (as distinguished from Carat) is a measure of the purity of gold. Most gold jewelry is actually made from a gold alloy containing gold and another metal or metals. 18K gold, for example, is 75% pure gold.

Lab created: Refers to gemstones created in a laboratory rather than by nature. A lab created gemstone is typically the same material chemically as its natural counterpart, as in the case of corundum produced by flame fusion orquartz grown using the hydrothermal method.

Lapidary: The science and art of cutting and polishing gems to their finished state.

Loupe Clean: A gemstone is said to be Loupe Clean when no inclusions or defects are visible when the gem is viewed with 10 times magnification. See also Eye Clean.

Luster: The outward appearance of a gem or organic material. The quantity and quality of light that is reflected from the surface of a stone. Luster is important especially when evaluating the quality of pearls.

Marquise: The marquise shape is an elongated oval with points on both ends. Said to be named after the Marquise de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV.

Metallic (luster): One of the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. A gemstone that is reflective like polished metal is said to have a metallic luster. Hematite is one of the rare examples.

Mohs Hardness Scale: Numerical scale ranging from 1 to 10 developed by Friedrich Mohs that assigns a rating to a gem according to its ability to resist scratching. The hardest is 10 (diamond) and the softest is 1 (talc).

Synthetic Moissanite A lab-created diamond simulant based on the structure of natural moissanite. On Mohs’ scale of hardness, moissanite is 9.5. It has more brilliance, fire and luster than any hard jewel on earth, including diamond.

Oiling Oiling infuses colorless oils, resins or waxes into tiny surface-breaking fissures to hide them and give certain gemstones a cleaner appearance. This long-practiced clarity enhancement is used mainly for emerald and jade. The oils used are either natural or have a natural counterpart. If coloring agents are added to the oil, the stones are classified as dyed rather than oiled.

Opaque A term used for gemstones that you cannot see any light passing through the gem. Lapis, onyx and malachite are an example of this. Although recently color enhanced large size ruby, emeralds and opaque sapphires are available also.

Organic (gemstone) Most gemstones are minerals with a crystal structure but some gems, such as amber and pearl, are organic rather than mineral, being formed by plants and animals. See also Amorphous gemstones.

Padparadscha Derived from the Sinhalese term for “lotus flower,” padparadscha refers to a lush pink and orange sapphire resembling the color of the lotus. Padparadscha is also sometimes used to refer to other types of gemstones, such as topaz and tourmaline, with this unique coloration.

Paraiba: A rare copper-bearing tourmaline with an intense blue or blue-green color, first found in the state of Paraiba in Brazil in late 90’s. There have been recent finds in Central Africa of similar material, and the term “paraiba” is now used to refer to all examples of this copper-bearing tourmaline. See also Copper-bearing.

Pavilion: The lower portion of a gemstone that begins just below the girdle.

Pear Cut: Resembling a pear or teardrop, this fancy cut is rounded on one end and pointed on the other. Teardrop shaped stones are mostly used to make pendants.

Phenomenal Gems: Gems that display unusual optical properties such as color change, chatoyancy, asterism or iridescence. Alexandrite is one such example.

Pigeon’s Blood: Refers to the most prized color of red in rubies. Pigeon’s blood red is thought to be a pure red with a hint of blue. It is associated most with rubies from Burma, though any ruby could be this color.

Pleochroism: The ability of certain gems to display two or more colors when viewed from different angles. This is a term also used for Dichroism and trichroism.

Point: A gemstone unit weight equal to 1/100 of a carat.

Portuguese Cut: The portuguese cut refers to a particular type of faceting where the gem is cut with three rows (simple cut = two rows) of rhomboidal and two rows of triangular facets above the girdle (crown) and four rows of rhomboidal and one row of triangular facets below the girdle (pavilion). The portuguese cut thus has an extra row of facets on the crown, and this style enhances the brilliance of the gem. The portuguese cut is one of the most popular fancy cuts in the market and you’ll find many varieties of gems cut in this style.

Precious (gemstone): Traditionally, the four precious gemstones are diamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald. But other gems have also been labeled precious at times, including opal and amethyst. Today, the distinction between precious and semi-precious gems has been rejected by some gem trade associations. See also Semi-Precious gemstones.

Refraction: The bending of light as it enters a medium and slows down.

Refractive Index: A process using a refractometer to measure the speed and angle of light entering a gemstone. Very important for gem identification.

Rough: In gemology, this refers to the raw, natural state in which gems are found, before they are cut.

Rutiles: Needle-like inclusions (or foreign matter) within stones. These can produce some gem phenomena as an asterism (star) or cat’s eye (chatoyancy.)

Rubellite: Used to refer to the red variety of tourmaline, including the color range from pink to red. More of a marketing than a gemological term; these days gemologists tend to use simply “red tourmaline.”

Saturation: Saturation is one of three characteristics used to describe the appearance of color. Saturation (also known as intensity) refers to the brightness or vividness of a color. See also hue and tone.

Semi-precious (gemstone): Traditionally, the four precious gemstones arediamond, ruby, sapphire and emerald. Semi-precious gemstones include everything else. But other gems have also been labelled precious at times, including opal, amethyst and pearl. Today, the distinction between precious and semi-precious gems has been rejected by some gem trade associations.See also Precious gemstones.

Sheen: This effect resembles luster, and is caused by light reflection from inclusions or texture inside the gem. Luster is light reflected from the surface of the gem and sheen is reflection from inside the gemstone.

Side Stone (Accents): Side stones are set around or beside the center stone in a jewelry setting.

Single Cut: Stones with seventeen facets or fewer.

Single Refraction: Most gemstones are doubly refractive — they have 2 refractive indices. Only a few gemstones have a single refractive index, specifically diamond, spinel and garnet. See also Birefringence.

Solitaire: A solitaire, often found in rings and pendants, is a single stone in a simple setting

Species: The term used to designate a family of gemstones. For example, corundum is a species that contains the varieties sapphire and ruby. The Quartz family contains amethyst, citrine, and chalcedony, to name a few.

Specific Gravity: see density

Step Cut: As per gemstone terminology a step cut is referred to as a stone with rectangular facets along the perimeter.

Swiss Cut: A gemstone cut consisting of exactly thirty-three facets.

Synthetic (gemstone): A synthetic gemstone is man-made and has no traces of earth mined elements. Natural gemstones which are treated by industry-accepted methods such as heat, diffusion or irradiation are not classified as synthetic.

Table: The flat top part of a gemstone. The table is the largest facet.

Tone: One of 3 characteristics used to describe the appearance of color. Tone refers to the lightness or value of the lightness in a particular stone. See also Saturation and Hue.

Translucent: A quality of a gemstone transmitting light imperfectly so that one cannot see through the stone clearly. 

Transparent: There are several ways a light travels through a stone. In a transparent stone, the light travels through stone with generally zero distortion. Transparent stones are clear and easy to see through. 

Treated stone: A stone that has been heated, dyed, irradiated, or stained in order to improve the color or the clarity. Also pertains to gems that have their cracks or fractures concealed by filling the material.

Trichroism: A property of a stone that will show three colors or shades of the same color when the stone is viewed through a dichroscope.

Trillion Cut: A faceted cut in a triangular shape with 44 facets.

Vitreous A technical term referring to the luster of a gemstone. Gemstones with a vitreous or glassy luster are by far the most common in the gems world.

Waxy: One of the technical terms used to refer to the luster of a gemstone. Turquoise and malachite are examples of gemstones with a waxy luster.

Window: In a well faceted gem, the pavilion facets (those on the lower half of the stone) should reflect light back out the top or table of the stone. If the facets are cut below the critical angle for the particular material, light will pass right through the stone instead of being reflected back towards your eye making the stone dull with barely any luster or brilliance.

Zoning (color zoning): A gemological term that describes the uneven distribution of color in a gemstone. Zoning is best seen when looking at the stone through the top table facet. This determines the pricing of a gemstone to a very large extent.

When purchasing a gemstone online or even physically in a retail store could be a difficult ordeal specially if you are a first time buyer. There are many factors which determine price of the stones. Below mentioned are some of the factors which influence pricing directly and indirectly.

Gemstone Shapes make a huge difference in pricing. Generally round, oval, cushion and princess cuts are most popular and everything else are lower pricing wise.


This chart is used mostly in case of loose white diamonds but also seldom used in colored gemstone purchases.



Some Gemstone Clarity Grading Examples which influence pricing directly.